When tragedy strikes, communities respond

Ohio's Amish country, Holmes Co. OH

Even a peaceful scene in Amish country can become tragic.

Tragedy. It’s bound to invade our lives, often when we least expect it. Too often, it happens more than once in our lifespan.

Unfortunately, we likely have all seen our fair share of tragedy. Calamity merely is part of life. That doesn’t make it any easier to accept.

I’ve seen and experienced a lot of tragic incidents in my life as a member of volunteer fire and rescue squads. Often I knew people involved in the emergency incidents. That’s not surprising when you live most of your life in a close-knit, rural community.

Sometimes tragic national news hits close to home, too. The recent fatal shooting of Dean Beachy and his son Steve is proof of that. Naturally, people were shocked and horrified at the senseless killings.

Their lives are a huge loss to the family and the many, many people they touched. My wife knew the family well, having taught Steve’s three older brothers.

Ohio's Amish country, Holmes Co. OH

An hour after a tornado damaged this farm building, neighbors came to repair its roof.

Most likely, we each could create a long list of personal tragedies that have significantly impacted our lives. Mine would have to start even before I was born.

My great grandfather was killed in an auto accident involving a drunk driver. The crash critically injured my father and his only brother a block from their home. My uncle’s traumatic head injuries caused lifelong, family-wide ramifications.

My mother’s father was electrocuted six months before I was born. I am sure you have a comparable list of interpersonal human misfortune.

We learn life lessons from tragedies. One is when disaster strikes, people respond. That’s the way community works. What affects one family affects us all to varying degrees.

My wife and I experienced and witnessed positive responses many times over our four decades of living in Holmes County, Ohio. When bad things happen to good people, others want to help. So they do. They bring food, share tears, hugs, and sit quietly with the victims’ family.

Some tragedies happen suddenly, like the Beachy shootings, a traffic crash or a house fire. Others happen gradually and last over an extended time. Likely, we have all known someone diagnosed with a terminal illness.

In either situation, shock, denial, anger, fear, and blame all surface in the face of loss. Often those emotions occur at different times for different family members. Heartache knows no boundaries. To be there is what really matters to the hurting individuals.

Ohio's Amish country, Holmes Co. OH

Barn fire.

As an EMT, I once responded to a drowning call at an Amish farm. The toddler was dead by the time we arrived in the country setting. Still, all the first responders wanted to do something. We comforted the grieving family as best we could.

With the corner’s approval, I carried the youngster’s body to the ambulance where family, friends, and neighbors filed through saying their goodbyes. It was the Amish way, and the officials in charge wanted to respect that.

Regardless of the type of tragedy, whether sudden or lengthy, no one is immune. As human beings, we can choose to offer whatever we can or to ignore the situation.

Those who chose the former realize that in giving there is receiving. In caring, appreciation is returned. In listening, genuine sharing occurs. With your presence, acceptance and understanding slowly unfold.

Human beings have a responsibility to one another, to be kind, to be generous, to be available, to help, to be respectful. There is no better time to express those gifts than when tragedy strikes.

It’s not merely the way a community responds. It is the way a caring community thrives.

Ohio's Amish county, Holmes Co. OH

This Amish barn raising occurred less than a month after the farmer’s barn burned.

© Bruce Stambaugh 2019

11 Comments

Filed under Amish, column, family, human interest, news, Ohio, Ohio's Amish country, photography, rural life, writing

11 responses to “When tragedy strikes, communities respond

  1. Bruce, so sorry to hear that the loss of life in the Beachy family were people you knew. That happened close by us, and our community is saddened that it could happen in what we know as “Happy Valley”. I read the memorial of the father and son, and found it so touching. What wonderful people they were, and too soon taken by a senseless act. Your blog touches on so many aspects of tragedies we don’t understand. Bless you for writing such a thought provoking blog.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pamela lakits

    Wow. Those are some powerful words. Thank you Bruce for your insight, your compassion and wisdom. Like you said, tragedy will hit us all in some way at some point in our lives, unless of course we are extremely lucky.When people take the time to step in and help, a community, a family is formed. My deepest sympathy to you and your wife as you grieve for this family. A family that will be forever changed.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Joanne Cuny

    God’s peace at this sad time to their family…and to you & your wife.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Gail B.

    Your words shine a light into a dark corner of this place we call home. Our thoughts are with the Beachy family. Thank you Bruce

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Carol

    My sympathy to the Beachy family, to you and your wife also. May our Lord touch each heart left behind with His peace, comfort, and strength.
    In Christ, Carol

    Liked by 1 person

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