Generation Next embraces a family vacation tradition

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The Lakeside pavilion, framed by holly hocks. © Bruce Stambaugh 2014.

By Bruce Stambaugh

My parents took my brothers and sisters there. My wife and I took our daughter and son there. And now, our daughter and her husband have taken their three children there, too.

“There” is Lakeside, Ohio. Nurturing body, mind and spirit, it’s an ideal family vacation destination. Activities abound for youngsters through oldsters, all under the umbrella of the Chautauqua community’s four pillars, religion, recreation, arts and entertainment, and education.

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The fountain in front of historic Hotel Lakeside. © Bruce Stambaugh 2014.

Of course, my wife and I were excited to have our daughter and her family, and her husband’s mother, too, join us for our annual Lakeside retreat. The last few years we had accompanied them to their beach vacations. I hoped the grandkids, ages 10, eight and four, would take to Lakeside the way they took to pounding waves on ocean beaches.

Located on the south shore of Lake Erie on the Marblehead Peninsula, there is plenty of water, just not much sand at the little Lakeside swimming area. There would be no challenging the waves this year, or so I thought.

Another concern was that Lakeside thrives on traditions of the past, when times and communication were both slower and life seemed simpler. I wondered if the kids would miss their high-tech toys in the quaint town, founded in 1873 as a Methodist Church camp.

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Even at their ages, our grandkids are no different than any others. They can run iPhones, iPads and iPods, and I can’t. I hoped they would embrace Lakeside’s wide variety of low-tech opportunities.

Boy did they ever, partly because some of the educational and recreational activities involved technology. Kids and their parents, or in come cases grandparents, built Lego robots. Faces flashed accomplishment when their robots responded to command.

The four-year old painted a beach bucket in an art class. She also easily made friends playing in the sand with little girls she had never met.

(Click on the photos to enlarge them.)

While adults attended classes and lectures, the boys each had more fun building toy boats. When completed, they held their maiden voyage in the children’s pool.

Under the abundant shade of the giant hardwoods, the kids wore out the miniature golf course. It was in the same grove of trees where I had picnicked with my family decades ago.

Our grandkids discovered a Lakeside treat. They downed fresh donuts, made daily at an iconic seasonal restaurant. However, what

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Flowers and rock sculptures brighten the shoreline in Lakeside. © Bruce Stambaugh

really got our daughter’s family’s attention were the shuffleboard courts. Too concerned with watching boats and birds, I had never paid much attention to the game even though national and international shuffleboard tournaments are held at Lakeside.

Thanks to my grandchildren, daughter and son-in-law, that changed. I learned more about shuffleboard in one morning than I had ever known before. They shuttled the disks down the well-maintained courts until it was time to head out. In other words, they had a blast.

No Lakeside vacation is complete without at least one round of dominoes. The grandkids learn to play that game, too. I have a feeling the dominoes will click the next time we gather.

I was wrong about the waves, too. When the northeast wind kicked up large whitecaps on the lake, the kids stood at dock’s edge hoping to get spritzed. At the famous Marblehead Lighthouse nearby, they successfully dashed from one rock ledge to the other, teasing the waves.

It was great to see our family’s next generation enjoy Lakeside so much and in so many ways. It truly was what Lakeside is all about.

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Dodging waves on the rocks at Marblehead Lighthouse. © Bruce Stambaugh 2014.

© Bruce Stambaugh 2014

4 Comments

Filed under column, family, Lakeside, Ohio, photography, writing

4 responses to “Generation Next embraces a family vacation tradition

  1. Growing up in Northeast Ohio, I can’t believe I never visited Lakeside. Usually, we made trips to Geneva-on-the-Lake or Pymatuning. On an unrelated note, Bruce, if you’re interested in some interesting Civil War reading, you should check out this book I’m reading now about Amish during the sectional conflict. It’s a great read: http://www.amazon.com/Mennonites-American-Anabaptist-Pietist-Studies-ebook/dp/B004SHFUMY/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1407090887&sr=1-1&keywords=amish+in+civil+war

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  2. The water looks just beautiful and the flowers stunning. With all the rain we’ve had this year, I’ve been noting HUGE hollyhocks that normally look more like weeds with flowers on top! I also wanted to tell you I read your lovely and interesting story about the “Wedding” in the Amish tourism magazine as we passed through Ohio recently. We stopped at Lehman’s Hardware and I was browsing through the magazine and as I read the article without finding a byline, I thought, this sounds like Bruce Stambaugh. Finally when I found the byline, I was not surprised. A bittersweet wedding for sure, and congrats on the article in the magazine! Blessings, Melodie

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  3. Thanks, Melodie. Holly Hocks and Glads are my favorite flowers. They are extra beautiful this year. I didn’t like the placement of the byline on that story either. I’m glad you got to read it. An extended version of that story will be in my book, which I need to get back to writing.

    Thanks, again.

    Bruce

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